I play hard, and go to bed early. Barber. Born in '79. Live just a little bit north of Los Angeles.


PS- I take no credit for the pictures I post.

betsyandme2:

Welcome home.

betsyandme2:

Welcome home.

(Source: valosalo)

sammneiland:

phoenixflorid:

lauraheartstaxes:

Just printed this for my refrigerator. Thanks tumblr, once again you are AWESOME.

where has this been my whole life

i’m glad to know that when the end of the world comes, i can count on honey.

(Source: the-more-u-know)

joshschutz:

Just spent the last 3 days in this enchanting location.

joshschutz:

Just spent the last 3 days in this enchanting location.

(Source: bishopdane)

sanborncanoecompany:

Tettegouche State Park on the north shore of Lake Superior. #ScoutForth folks! Photo by @malimish_airstream

sanborncanoecompany:

Tettegouche State Park on the north shore of Lake Superior. #ScoutForth folks! Photo by @malimish_airstream

unexplained-events:

The Mata Mata Turtle

Found mostly in South America. Its shell resembles bark, and its head resembles fallen leaves, making it an expert at camouflage. It is also an expert at looking like my nightmares.

gameraboy:

Jean Hersholt selling Vaseline Cream Hair Tonic, “the cream of them all!” 1949 ad

stetsonusa:

where I hang my hat(s) is home.

stetsonusa:

where I hang my hat(s) is home.

peashooter85:

The Sapper’s Lee Enfield, World War I,

During World War I, the stalemate of trench warfare led both sides to attempt tunnel warfare.  The common strategy was for one side to attempt to dig a tunnel under the trenches.  The tunnel was filled with explosives, detonated, and it was hoped that the explosion would eliminate the enemy above ground, thus allowing a breakthrough.  Perhaps the most prolific user of such a tactic were the British, whose Royal Engineers, a.k.a. “sappers”, were employed from experienced Welsh, Cornish, and Australian miners.  

The Germans didn’t simply allow the British to simply mine through their trenches at will.  To stop the British, the Germans responded by digging countermines.  It was not uncommon for both sides to stumble upon each other, leading to a pitched gun battle in the tight confines of a tunnel hundreds of feet below ground.  In such combat the use of pistols was ideal, however only officers were issued with revolvers.  The rest were issued with standard Lee Enfield infantry rifles.  Unfortunately, the long and unwieldy rifles would not do for tunnel warfare.

 To solve this problem the British sappers made pistols of their own by cutting down their standard issue rifles.  Often the stock and the barrel was chopped down to a mere stub.  The short little weapon would have surely kicked very hard, not to mention make a deafening noise when fired.  When possible, sappers used specially loaded ammunition which was underpowered compared to regular rifle ammunition.

The sappers’ finest hour occurred in 1917 at the Battle of Messines.  Located south of Ypres, the countryside was dominated by a large hill called “hill 60”.  Early on in the war the Germans heavily fortified the hill, managing to hold it throughout most of the war.   Then, in 1917, sappers of the 2nd British Army mined 22 tunnels underneath the large hill.  The hill was then packed with almost 500 tons of explosives, then detonated.  It was said that the massive explosion was so loud that citizens in London could hear it.  The resulting explosion devastated German forward defenses, and allowed the British to make a successful breakthrough resulting in an Allied Victory.

horroroftruant:

Grindhouse Horror Movie Posters (9 Images)

Grindhouse is an American term for a theater that mainly showed exploitation films. It is thought to stem from the defunct burlesque theaters on 42nd Street, New York, where “bump n’ grind” dancing and striptease used to be on the bill. In the 1960s these theaters were put to new use as venues for exploitation films, a trend which continued strongly throughout the 1970s in New York City and other urban centers, mainly in North America, but began a long decline during the 1980s with the advent of home video.

Exploitation film is an informal label which may be applied to any film which is generally considered to be low budget, and therefore apparently attempting to gain financial success by “exploiting” a current trend or a niche genre or a base desire for lurid subject matter. The term “exploitation” is common in film marketing for promotion or advertising in any type of film. These films then need something to exploit, such as a big star, special effects, sex, violence, or romance. An “exploitation film”, however, due to its low budget, relies more heavily than usual on “exploitation”. Very often, exploitation films are widely considered to be of low quality, and are generally “B movies”. Even so, they sometimes attract critical attention and cult followings. Some films which might readily be labeled as “exploitation films” have become trend setters and of historical importance in their own right, such as Night of the Living Dead (1968). Some films also might be advertised by the producers themselves as “exploitation films” in order to pique the interest of those who seek out films of this type.

blueeyez28:

ultrafacts:

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And the light at the end of the tunnel is the birth canal.

blueeyez28:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

And the light at the end of the tunnel is the birth canal.